Saying ‘yes’ to women supporting women.

A while back I was invited to be part of a November 1 fashion show in support of Kellee Student Education Foundation Africa (KSEFA) – a volunteer organization that offers educational support for women in South Sudan and Nairobi, Kenya.

FAshion Forward

I’ll be walking the catwalk for this SOLD OUT fashion fundraiser.

As part of my commitment to say ‘yes’ to opportunities that come my way, I agreed. But being a journalist, I wanted to learn more about KSEFA and the women it supports.

Turns out, the organization has ties to my home town thanks to a friendship that developed between Kellee Jacobs and KSEFA founder Lino Madut Angok. Kellee is the daughter of London-based image and style consultant, Sue Jacobs.

Kellee and Madut

Lino Madut Angok and Kellee Jacobs.

Kellee is currently living in Nairobi where she works as a monitoring and evaluation specialist for the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM). We recently connected by email so I could learn more about how our evening of style will help women half-way around the world.

KSEFA doesn’t have a website. Can you tell me a bit about the initiative?
KSEFA was founded in Nairobi in 2010, but began operations under Lino  in 2012. The program supports the education of women aged 24-40 from South Sudan who may not have had access to learning. It also offers technical training, including sewing and tailoring. There are also elements of peace programming, a focus on women and youth, and counseling and coaching of what is sometimes a traumatized group.

KSEFA is registered as a non-government organization in South Sudan and is awaiting registration in Kenya. The cost of registration in Kenya is quite high, so any available funds have previously been prioritized for actual educational programming. With funds coming in soon, Lino hopes to be able to continue classes and pay the registration and legal fees for the formalization of KSEFA in Kenya.

How did you meet Lino?
Lino was a student at Sud Academy in Nairobi, a school originally for South Sudanese refugees who cannot afford school fees in the Kenyan school system. I met him there in 2008 when he was in the equivalent of Grade 11. We spent three years working together at the school to develop small, high-impact projects like building a science lab, creating a sustainable water access and purification system, and a scholarship program that allows students in Grade 12 to join a neighbouring school for their final year so they can graduate with diplomas.

How will the November 1 fundraiser help support KSEFA? 
All of the funds raised in London will support two learning locations helping South Sudanese migrants and refuges living in Nairobi, Kenya

With the funds raised, Lino would like to be able to provide small incentives to volunteer teachers at each location, as well as pay some small fees to the churches where classes take place. He will also purchase school supplies like chalk, pencils and books to be shared by the students.

Tell me a bit about the women who are supported by KSEFA.
Many have come to Nairobi from the refugee camps in northern Kenya. Others have come directly from South Sudan, displaced by the last 5 years of war and economic collapse in their country.

These women are interested in learning to help support themselves day-to-day in a fast paced urban environment – at the supermarket, with documents they are required to understand, on immigration and legal issues. They need to have a basic understanding of literacy, English, numbers, math, and their rights. This school is not a formal education centre that teaches the full Kenyan curriculum, but rather a stop-gap that provides otherwise unavailable opportunities to give people the knowledge they need in order to survive.

Lino teaching

KSEFA teaches literacy and math skills to help women in their day-to-day lives.

Of course, I’m not the only local entrepreneur involved in this fashion fundraiser. In fact, I’m honoured to be in the company of such an amazing group of sponsors and participants:

Sponsors2

Check out these incredible sponsors! 

We all owe Sue Jacobs and Allison Stephens a huge THANK YOU for being the driving force behind this amazing opportunity! Keep an eye on my Facebook page for photos….coming soon!

 

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A look back at 2013

As another year draws to an close, the annual deluge of ‘Top 10 Lists’ is upon us.  So in the spirit of the season, I’ve decided to end this year of blogging with a look back at three of my favourite stories of 2013.

As 2013 comes to an end, I look back at some of my favourite stories of the past year.

As 2013 comes to an end, I look back at some of my favourite stories of the past year.

Listed in no particular order, they are simply what spring to mind when I reflect on which stories have stayed with me beyond their short shelf-life:

Partnering Research and Industry Health Sciences Matters, 2013

This story was an assignment for Western University’s Health Sciences Matters alumni magazine.

Writing about a medical device designed to help people swallow may sound like a dull day at the office, but interviewing Professor Ruth Martin quickly made me realize that swallowing is one of those things people don’t appreciate until it’s gone.

Professor Ruth Martin's enthusiasm for her research was infectious.

Professor Ruth Martin’s enthusiasm for her research was infectious.

In fact, a quick chat with my father confirmed that the loss of the ability to swallow was indeed one of the major complications my grandfather suffered after his final – and ultimately fatal – stroke.

Professor Martin’s device works by shooting pulses of air at the back of the mouth, and she is partnering with Trudell Medical International to bring it to market. This brings me to another memorable aspect of preparing this story – interviewing London business icon, Mitch Baran.

It took a quite few attempts to reach the president and CEO of Trudell Medical, but once I had him on the phone he was a dream interview.

After asking my first question Baran proceeded to give me all the information I needed to complete my story – without any further prompting or extraneous information. (Which, as any journalist will tell you, sure beats sifting through 45 minutes of tape to find one decent quote!)

The Joy of Slowing Downeatdrink, September / October 2013

I am a sucker for small town restaurants. So I was excited when I received an assignment to do a write-up on Anna Mae’s Bakery & Restaurant from Flanagan Food Services’ Selections magazine. A quick Google search reveled that the bakery was located in Millbank, Ontario – just outside Stratford – and only about an hour from home.

Since I always prefer to see something with my own eyes, it sounded like the perfect excuse for a summer road trip with my mother!

Anna Mae’s did not disappoint, and Millbank – the commercial heart of the area’s vibrant Mennonite community – was a delight.

Turkey Club

Mom and I enjoyed a delicious lunch at Anna Mae’s!

Our after-lunch stroll through the village brought us to another hidden gem – the Millbank Cheese Factory. As we stocked up on their famous cheddar I thought “This is a story for eatdrink magazine.”

I made the pitch and ended up expanding my initial assignment into two different stories – always a bonus for a freelance writer. The best part – we now have a fun place to visit after morning hockey games against the Stratford Warriors!

Sounds From the Ashes The Beat Magazine, November 2013

I have been writing about Serenata Music and its founder, Renee Silberman, since the chamber music series debuted nine years ago.  But I felt this particular concert deserved some extra attention.

“Banned Composers, Forbidden Music” commemorated the 75th anniversary of Kristal Nacht. What better way to remember the beginning of one of history’s most terrible times than to perform music the Nazis wanted to silence forever?

The concert commemorated the beginning of the end for many of Europe's Jews.

The concert commemorated the beginning of the end for many of Europe’s Jews.

In fact, this concert featured a few works that have only recently been rediscovered, after miraculously surviving the Holocaust even when their composers did not. That fact just reinforces my belief that creativity and culture can overcome even the worst oppression to be a powerful reminder of what is good in the world.

With that said, I wish you all a very happy holiday season, and a wonderfully creative 2014!