How to generate more news coverage for your upcoming arts event

As some of you may know, I have covered the London and area classical music scene for more than a decade, writing regular music columns for several different publications over the years: Scene, ArtScape, The Beat, and most recently Eat Drink.

And as my deadline approached this month, I once again found myself wanting to bang my head on my computer screen. Why? Because several sources were simply not responding to interview requests.

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I currently write The Classical Beat column for Eat Drink magazine.

As a freelance classical musician turned freelance writer, I’ve been on both sides of the divide. I know that artists live busy lives and often juggle multiple jobs just to make ends meet. I know that most arts organizations can’t afford to splash out on expensive advertising campaigns. And I’ve heard the complaints about the lack of news coverage given to local arts events.

I don’t want to paint everyone with the same brush. Some arts organizations are fantastic to work with. Others, not so much. This blog is directed towards those in the second category, as well as anyone looking to see your name – and news – in print.

Have a website, and keep it up to date
In 2016, there’s really no excuse not to have a decent website. Whether you’re an individual performer or a larger ensemble, it’s simply an investment that you can’t afford not to make.

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People won’t find you if you don’t have a website….

It’s equally important to keep the information current, and to ensure that it’s accurate. Don’t forget to include contact information. (And if your website uses a contact form, make sure it actually reaches an inbox that someone checks!)

Friendly tip: Websites like Eventbrite now make it easy for anybody to sell tickets online. If you’ve got an upcoming concert, why not set up an account and link it to your own site?

Make a media list, and keep it up to date
Pay attention to who is covering the arts in your area, and make a media list. Don’t rely on generic info@ email addresses – who knows where they go? Try to find contact information for the individual reporters.

Friendly tip: Most newspaper websites list individual contact information…you just have to find it. Try scrolling to the very, very, very bottom of the Home Page. That’s where they like to hide the link to the Contact Us page. When in doubt, don’t be afraid to pick up the phone to ask for a reporter’s contact information.

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Do some detective work to track down the emails of individual reporters.

Then, when you’ve got an upcoming event, let the media know. A formal news release is great, but a friendly email with some key information can also do the trick.

Give enough lead time and understand the news cycle
It’s the first week of October, and I just filed my November / December Classical Beat column. I’ll soon start working on a story that won’t be published until Spring 2017. That’s why it’s so important to get your information up on your website as soon as possible. I can’t cover your upcoming concert if my story was filed last week.

Having said that, most newspapers will only cover your event the day of, or if you’re lucky, the day before. Same goes for radio and television.

Respond to interview requests
There’s nothing worse than sending out interview requests and leaving phone messages that are never returned. (Other than finally hearing back two weeks after the story has been submitted.)

We’re all busy…but please respond quickly so we can find a mutually-convenient time to chat. If an email interview works better, just let me know and I’ll send my questions along. Please don’t make me chase you, or have to stalk you on Facebook….

Be prepared
Have the list of repertoire ready, as well as the names of any special guests. If you’ve got bios, send them along. High resolution photographs? Even better!

Take some time to think about what you’d like the public to know about your event. If you think you’ll be nervous during the interview, jot down some notes. If the reporter doesn’t ask about something important, just go ahead and tell them. And if you go blank and forget a crucial detail, send a follow-up email.

If you’re an artist, or part of an arts organization, what challenges do you face getting the word out? 

Nicole Laidler is a London, Ontario based freelance writer and copywriter and the owner of Spilled Ink Writing & Wordsmithing. 

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And The Beat goes on….online!

As many of you may know, The Beat Magazine ceased publication at the end of the summer. From our first issue in September 2009 to our last in August 2013, being Beat editor was a wonderful professional and personal adventure. But as the saying goes: all good things must come to an end.

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The Beat ended on a high note with our 2013 Summer issue.

As it turns out, some good things are harder to kill than others, and after an outpouring of support from readers and the local arts community, Beat publisher Richard Young decided to keep our website up and running.

While this means I’m out of a job as a magazine editor, I do get to continue doing one of my favourite things – interviewing and writing stories about the local classical music scene.

Most recently, I chatted with the always charming and very knowledgeable Renee Silberman of Serenata Music, who is presenting an evening of music banned by the Nazis in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht.

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Serenata Music’s Renee Silberman.

The November 9 concert, co-sponsored by the London Jewish Community Centre, features music by composers who were persecuted and often murdered by the Nazi regime.

Writing the story got me thinking about music as a political force. And while it’s somewhat difficult for us to imagine the arts posing any sort of threat to the government, Renee points out that the Nazis were experts in mass manipulation and that culture can indeed play a large role in defining social norms.

(Just look at the ongoing debate about Miley Cyrus’ onstage antics and whether she is a feminist icon celebrating her sexuality or merely another young women exploited by a money-hungry patriarchy. Whatever your opinion on the matter, the fact remains that we’ve come a long way since Elvis’ hip action was considered too risque for television.)

Another ongoing local debate is London’s need for a performing arts venue. To make a long story short, our city is the only one of its size in Canada without a proper venue – but we still can’t seem to convince enough people that this matters.

So when I had the opportunity to interview Orchestra London conductor Alain Trudel about this season’s Opening Night, I couldn’t resist asking him what he thought Londoners were missing out on.

Alain Trudel

Alain Trudel had an unexpected answer for my question about a Performing Arts Centre.

His answer was not about the orchestra’s need for a hall with decent acoustics or site-lines. It was about the need for a place for the community to come together to make music.

I’m looking forward to continuing to share those community stories with Beat readers, both in regular feature stories and in my monthly Classical Q&A columns.  And if you’ve got an arts story that needs to be heard, please drop us a line! You can still reach me at thebeateditor[at]gmail[dot]com.