Take 5 with Kelsey Ramsden

This week started with a smashed cell phone, which put me behind the eight ball work wise. But I decided to honour my commitment to attend a breakfast meeting with Mompreneurs London on Thursday – and it was well worth the effort.

This month’s speaker was Canadian businesswoman Kelsey Ramsden.

Kelsey Ramsden

Canadian business maven Kelsey Ramsden was this month’s featured speaker.

This mother of three was named Canada’s Top Female Entrepreneur by Profit and Chatelaine magazines in 2012 & 2013. She has founded and run everything from a construction company to a monthly play subscription service, holds an MBA from the Ivey School of Business, and is an in-demand business coach and speaker. And that’s the extreme Coles Notes version of her resumé.

See why I went?

Instead of simply presenting a prepared talk, Kelsey took questions from the audience. She answered with a refreshing mix of candor, humour and no BS honesty.

My journalism ears pricked up. Instead of taking conventional notes, I began to jot down newsworthy quotes.

In no particular order, here are my top five takeaways from Kelsey Ramsden:

On the biggest lesson learned as a business woman:
“Check your ego”

On developing a marketing strategy: 
“Move the closest people closer to the line.”

On selecting an online marketing platform:
“Human interaction converts best.”

On launching a speaking career:
“Learning how to speak is a different skill set from having something to say.”

On time management:
“To find time, steal it from somewhere else. The world will not end if your laundry does not get done.”

Words of wisdom for the week ahead!

What is the best business advice you’ve ever received? 

Nicole Laidler is passionate about helping people achieve success by helping them share their stories with the world. See what she’s been up to at Spilled Ink Writing & Wordsmithing. 

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My year of transformation

If there’s one word that sums up 2017 to date, it’s transformation.

Life as I knew it unraveled last November with the end of a 17-year relationship. By the end of 2016 I was settled into a new home and facing an unexpected future as a single mom. It felt a bit like jumping off a cliff – a mix of fear, exhilaration and the hope that I would eventually land in one piece.

cliff

I took a huge leap of faith….and jumped!

I decided to embrace the ride.

In March I attended a 3-day Business Mastery event, led by Colin Sprake of Make Your Mark. (Thank-you Sarah Clarke of Mompreneurs London for bringing Colin to London last year.)

The business and personal growth conference was exactly what I needed.

The event made me realize how much I love writing, and that I deserve to give myself the opportunity to continue helping others share their stories with the world.  Much to my own surprise, I signed up for MYM’s 12-month Business Mastery program, and have started to put some much-needed structure around my writing business.

It’s a work-in-progress and will be for a while, but I can already feel an internal shift as I grow from being a mom-who-writes into a female entrepreneur who provides a valuable service through her words.

You’ll see some of these changes already reflected on my website. Spilled Ink Writing & Wordsmithing now has a Vision and Mission Statement, and a clearly defined purpose.

Later that month, I also attended Joie Gharrity’s workshop on branding and marketing for women. (Thank-you Susan Jacobs for the nudge!) Gharrity flew in all the way from California to share her expertise and to encourage everyone in the room to “shine in our own spotlight.”

Joie Gharrity and Susan Jacobs

The amazing Susan Jacobs (l) brought Joie Gharrity (r) all the way to London to share her expertise.

I left with a new tribe of friends, some fantastic new ideas, and some new-found confidence about how I can better present myself to the world both in-person and on-line. It’s also a work-in-progress!

So here I am, one-third of the way into 2017. The sun is finally shining, and birds are building a nest on my new front porch. I still don’t know what the future will bring, but I’m doing my best to welcome change and enjoy the journey.

What word sums up your year so far?

Nicole Laidler is a story-based copywriter, marketing and website copywriter, content consultant and blogger based in London, Ontario. 

 

5 Networking Tips for Dummies (like me)

I’m not a big believer in making New Year’s resolutions. But this year, life threw me a curve ball. Let’s just say that I’ve been turfed from my comfort zone, and the time has come to set a few professional goals for the year ahead.

Getting out of my (home) office and building my professional network is at the top of my list. Since that’s a bit vague, my goal for 2017 is to attend one networking event or professional development session each month.

The only problem is, I’m a bit of an idiot when it comes to making the most of networking opportunities. Luckily, I know I’m an idiot. But back in September I attended a conference for women entrepreneurs where business coach Susan Regier spoke about just this topic.

susan-regier

Susan Regier is a successful marketing & business coach, content writer, and speaker. 

So as a reminder to myself, here are five tips that I took away from her presentation:

Set a Goal 
We all live busy lives. So be clear about what you want to get out of the event before you even set foot through the door. Do you want to meet a specific individual? Build professional knowledge? Or make a work connection? How will you introduce yourself? What will you ask others? The key, Susan says, is to be prepared.

Leave Your Friends at the Door
Susan points out that you’ll never meet new people if you spend the entire night chatting with your friends. Force yourself to walk the room and introduce yourself to someone new. This is your chance to expand your horizons – don’t waste it!

Find Common Ground
Networking events are not the place to make a sale. Rather, they are an opportunity to make a genuine connection with a stranger. Susan suggests looking for common ground by asking things like: Where did you grow up? What is your favourite travel destination? Do you play any sports?

Give Value
According to Susan, the best way to get value is to give value. That means being willing to help others without expecting anything in return.

Make a Great Second Impression
Everybody knows that first impressions count. But whatever happened to the follow up? If you make a connection with someone you’d like to build a relationship with, Susan says it’s crucial to reach out and make a second great impression.

Note to self: Work on your second impression! 

I’ll be attending my first professional development / networking event of 2017 later this week.

Wish me luck!

Nicole Laidler is an award-winning copywriter and feature writer and the owner of Spilled Ink Writing & Wordsmithing. When she’s not out on an interview or crafting copy she can usually be found walking her Newfoundland dog or trying to keep warm at her son’s hockey games. 

 

Career advice from one to watch

Sometimes you meet people and you just know they are going places. Such was the case when I first ran into Andrew Schiestel several years back. I can’t remember the occasion, but his can-do attitude and positive energy made a lasting impression, and I knew he’d be someone to watch.

Andrew Schiestel, tbk Creative

Andrew’s positive energy is infectious and makes a lasting impression.

In 2008, when he and partners Misha Allard and Melissa McInerney launched their first business venture Tagged By Kindness – a gift card school fundraising project that tracks acts of kindness online –  I pitched a story to Business London magazine. The editor didn’t bite.

A few years went by and I noticed that Tagged By Kindness had quietly morphed into a web development and marketing firm called tbk Creative. And all of a sudden Andrew seemed to be everywhere, speaking about harnessing the power of social media to help firms grow their brand, and do good in the process.

Andrew Schiestel keynote speaker

Andrew is a popular speaker on the power of social media and branding.

When tbk Creative won a national award for a Facebook social media campaign I knew it was time to try another pitch – and by now I had discovered that Andrew was a graduate of Fanshawe College’s Police Foundations program.

Fanshawe College Alumni News accepted my query, and that’s how I ended up spending a few hours last summer asking Andrew about his winding career path and unconventional business approach.

You can read the full story here on page 22, but there are a few thoughts that have stuck with me since our interview:

If you’re young and still trying to ‘find your calling’ – don’t panic.
Very few people in their 40’s are actually doing the job they thought they’d be doing in their 20’s. (I am a perfect example.) As long as you keep moving in the direction you think you want to head, life has a way of working out if you’re willing to put in the effort.

You don’t necessarily need a degree to launch a successful career.
Andrew has no ‘official’ qualifications as a marketer, communicator, or web developer. But he’s smart, a real people-person, full of curiosity, and has a solid work ethic. And he surrounds himself with colleagues who are just as dedicated to excellence as he is.

Sometimes starting at the top is the fastest way to get to the top.
Andrew made a strategic decision to go after London’s top companies and institutions right from the beginning. He wasn’t deterred by some initial setbacks, and within six months tbk Creative was working with a handful of nationally-recognized brands. (And of course, once the first contracts were landed he made sure to deliver great work.)

Swallow your fear and just forge ahead.
Andrew gave me one of my all-time favourite quotes:

“I think fear is the great paralyser of people’s dreams coming true. I would say fear is normal. It’s in all of us, including myself each and every day. The goal should be to look your fear in the eyes, get comfortable with that feeling, and act anyways.”

It’s taken me a long time to embrace my professional fear, and it’s something I wish I’d learned how to do earlier. It’s great advice, and absolutely necessary for anyone hoping for a freelance career.

What’s the best career advice you’ve ever received?

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